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June 1, 2012

Making Yoni Netanyahu’s Sacrifice Matter

PARIS—Forty-nine years ago last week, a 17-year-old Jonathan Netanyahu—having recently arrived in America from Israel with his parents and two younger brothers—wrote a remarkable letter to a friend back home. “Man does not live forever, and he should put the days of his life to the best possible use,” he wrote. “I only know that I don’t want to reach a certain age, look around me and suddenly discover that I’ve created nothing.”

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May 8, 2012

An Open Letter to Mitt Romney

by Stanley A. Weiss

WASHINGTON— Dear Governor,

You first became a candidate for public office 18 years ago, when you ran for the United States Senate in Massachusetts against the incumbent, Edward Kennedy.  The Senate you aspired to join then included a number of Republicans—from Bob Dole to William Cohen to John Warner—whose foreign policy expertise had earned them the title of “statesman.”  They were joined by equally impressive Democrats—like Sam Nunn and David Boren—who had helped Presidents of both parties shape America’s foreign policy in the second half of the 20th Century.

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May 1, 2012

Asia’s Quiet War

NEW DELHI, India—It is one of history’s great ironies that the Buddha grew up, attained enlightenment and taught in India, while Buddhism has gained its greatest number of adherents—nearly 40 percent of the population—in China. This discrepancy was on full display last December, with New Delhi and Beijing each jockeying to be the site of the new International Buddhist Confederation. Swayed by India’s status as Buddhism’s birthplace and displeased by China’s treatment of the Dalai Lama, 900 Buddhist delegates to a conference in India voted to establish Buddhism’s de facto world capital here in India’s capital.

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April 27, 2012

Iran is to India as Pakistan is to the U.S.

NEW DELHI—Tourists flying into this ancient city are sometimes surprised to find their descent re-routed at the last minute by the presence of an 86-foot bronze statue that sits at the end of a runway. The giant icon depicts none other than Lord Shiva, one of Hinduism’s most popular and powerful gods. Known alternatively as the destroyer and the creator, family man and hermit, teacher and warrior, kind herdsman and wrathful avenger—Shiva is, like India itself, a perfect symbol of contradictions.

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March 8, 2012

The Fire Next Time In Bangkok

BANGKOK, Thailand— Last October, the flood came. Cresting the banks of the swollen Chao Phraya River, runoff rolled through Thailand’s central plain, killing nearly 400 and displacing millions in the costliest natural disaster in the nation’s history.

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March 7, 2012

Getting Past the Symbolism of Aung San Suu Kyi

YANGON, MYAMAR—Few of us like to be reminded of mistakes made by heroes, particularly heroes of conscience.  Who among us remembers that Martin Luther King Jr. failed miserably when he tried to take the nonviolent strategies that worked so well in the segregated south of the United States to the industrialized north?  Who likes to remember that Nelson Mandela all but ignored the HIV/AIDS crisis raging across South Africa during his presidency, which eventually took the lives of millions, including his own son?

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March 1, 2012

Imagining ‘Eastphalia’

It began in the Netherlands, as outraged Calvinists smashed statues to protest the wealth and excesses of Spain and the Catholic Church. In Germany, starving soldiers laid waste to entire regions. The ensuing war engulfed all of 17th-century Europe in 80 years of bloody religious conflict. After the assassination of generals and the death of kings, after nearly one-third of Germany’s population lay dead from the plague or the sword, Europe’s rulers finally came together. They intended only to end the wars; they did not expect to create a new global order. But when they finally signed the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, Europe – and the world – was on its way to being transformed.

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February 28, 2012

They Don’t Want Democracy. They Want Freedom.

NAYPYIDAW Myanmar— Imagine for a moment what the United States would look like today if California, Texas, Florida, New York and Michigan had taken up armed rebellion against the U.S. government after World War II.  Imagine if the fighting continued for more than six decades, no matter who ran the government, right up until today.  And imagine how hard it would be for the federal government to convince investors that, despite the constant risk of armed attack, it was safe to invest in these resource-rich states.

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February 23, 2012

The First Thing the U.S. Should Do In Myanmar

YANGON, Myanmar— During the years he lived as a child in Indonesia, President Barack Obama learned the culture of Jakarta, spoke the language, survived chicken pox, and recalls frequently feeling “the sting of [his] teachers’ bamboo switches.” As a young military officer training in the United States, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, known as SBY, parachuted out of planes with Fort Benning’s storied 82nd Airborne Division and attended the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. It is an interesting parallel between presidents that each spent formative years in the other’s country.

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December 2, 2011

Huntsman is The Only Electable Republican

WASHINGTON—Watching the Republican primary race is a lot like being at a carnival. There’s the roller coaster of polling numbers, the kind that has Herman Cain surging to the top one week, then collapsing as Newt Gingrich rises. Then there’s the candidates themselves, who sometimes seem more like sideshow acts — each trying to top the next with a more outrageous statement — than actual contenders to be the next president of the United States.

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